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Environmental Technology

Job Outlook - Water and Liquid Waste Treatment Plant and System Operators

Significant Points

  • Employment is concentrated in local government and private water, sewage, and other systems utilities.
  • Completion of an associate degree or a 1-year certificate program increases an applicantís chances for employment and promotion.
  • Because the number of applicants in this field is normally low, job prospects will be good for qualified individuals, particularly those with training in all aspects of water and wastewater treatment.

Earnings

Median annual earnings of water and wastewater treatment plant and system operators were $34,960 in May 2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $27,180 and $43,720. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $21,700, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $53,540. Median annual earnings of water and liquid waste treatment plant and systems operators in May 2004 were $34,990 in local government and $32,350 in water, sewage, and other systems.

In addition to their annual salaries, water and wastewater treatment plant and system operators usually receive benefits that may include health and life insurance, a retirement plan, and educational reimbursement for job-related courses.

Suggested citation: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006-07 Edition, Water and Liquid Waste Treatment Plant and System Operators, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos229.htm.


Job Outlook - Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians

Significant Points

  • About 2 out of 5 specialists worked in Federal, State, and local government agencies that enforce rules on safety, health, and the environment.
  • Many employers, including the Federal Government, require a bachelorís degree in occupational health, safety, or a related field for some specialist positions.
  • Projected average employment growth reflects a balance of continuing public demand for a safe and healthy work environment against the desire for smaller government and fewer regulations.

Earnings

Median annual earnings of occupational health and safety specialists were $51,570 in May 2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $39,580 and $65,370. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $30,590, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $79,530. Median annual earnings of occupational health and safety specialists in May 2004 were $48,710 in local government and $44,400 in State government.

Median annual earnings of occupational health and safety technicians were $42,130 in May 2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $29,900 and $56,640. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $22,860, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $70,460.

Most occupational health and safety specialists and technicians work in large private firms or for Federal, State, and local governments, most of which generally offer more generous benefits than smaller firms.


Suggested citation: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006-07 Edition, Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos017.htm.


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