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Manufacturing Technology

CAM Option

College Catalog

Did you know the CAM Concentration has a 90.9% job placement rate? Source: 1999-2006 Graduate Follow-Up Surveys

This concentration provides students with broad training in various manufacturing technologies specializing in the use of computer numerically controlled machine tools.

Accreditations:

Accredited - The Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering

 

Haas Technical Education Council


Advisory Committee

Meeting Minutes

Committee Bylaws


Program Mission and Goals

Vision of the CAM Career Track

Students will acquire knowledge and skills, which enables them to effectively integrate into the evolving technological marketplace

Mission of the CAM Career Track

Our mission is to provide quality technical education that matches the needs of our community and area employers

Short Term Operational Goals of the CAM Career Track

  • Collaborate with business, industry, government, professional organizations, and the community to keep state of the art equipment, software, hardware, and facilities for our CAM students
  • Provide professional development opportunities for faculty, staff, and students
  • Collaborate with universities, colleges, and high schools to keep and create more articulation agreements
  • Collaborate with business, industry, and the community as partners to provide a quality learning experience that gives graduates the best opportunity to gain employment

Long Term Operational Goals of the CAM Career Track

  • Maintain NAIT programmatic accreditation to ensure a quality educational experience
  • Solicit input from our constituents including, students, graduates, advisory board members, business, industry, faculty, staff, and administration concerning the operation and improvement of the career track
  • Assess student and program performance through the use of outcomes assessment, Program Review and Evaluation Process, job placement rates, employer and graduate surveys
  • Increase enrollment through recruiting efforts including; business, industry, government, professional organizations, and high schools

Job Outlook

Significant Points

  • Manufacturing industries employ almost all of these workers.
  • Workers learn in apprenticeship programs, informally on the job, and in secondary, vocational, or postsecondary schools; many entrants have previously worked as machinists or machine setters, operators, and tenders.
  • Despite the projected decline in employment, job opportunities should be good, as employers are expected to continue to have difficulty finding qualified workers.

Earnings

Median hourly earnings of computer-controlled machine tool operators, metal and plastic, were $14.75 in May 2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $11.65 and $18.21. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $9.47, whereas the top 10 percent earned more than $21.67. Median hourly earnings in the manufacturing industries employing the largest numbers of computer-controlled machine tool operators, metal and plastic, in May 2004 were:

Metalworking machinery manufacturing $16.34
Other fabricated metal product manufacturing 15.62
Machine shops; turned product; and screw, nut, and bolt manufacturing 14.73
Motor vehicle parts manufacturing 13.55
Plastics product manufacturing 11.78

Median hourly earnings of numerical tool and process control programmers were $19.31 in May 2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $15.67 and $24.00. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $12.89, while the top 10 percent earned more than $28.89.

Suggested citation: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006-07 Edition, Computer Control Programmers and Operators, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos286.htm.


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